Devils Pool

uring the drier months of the year, the Zambezi River drops quite substantially, and from mid August to mid January, it is possible to walk along the lip of the falls. This can only be done from the Zambian side.

After thousands of years of erosion, many rock pools have formed and one of them has formed right on the very edge of the sheer drop. This is indeed the ultimate infinity pool.Scenic Devils Pool


It takes a rocky walk and swim in the Zambezi to reach the pool – then the fearless ones leap into the pool and get pushed to the edge by the force of the river.  The rock lip brings them to a halt as the raging waters of the Zambezi crash over the cliffs a few feet away. There are guides in attendance who are there to make sure you don’t go over the edge.

For the rest of the year, anyone foolish enough to enter the waters would be instantly swept to their deaths. But when levels drop, the natural rock walls of the Devil’s Pool come close enough to the surface to form a barrier and stop swimmers being carried away.

The view from the edge is totally exhilarating as you feel the force of the Zambezi flowing past you and crashing down over the precipice; a hundred meter drop.

Over 500 million litres of water a minute cascade over the almost 2km wide falls, causing a deafening and spectacular explosion of spray which can be seen 30 miles away.  This is why it is known locally as Mosi-oa-Tunya, or The Smoke that Thunders.

You can find guides who will take you on the Zambian side, at the entrance to the Falls. All you need is your costume and your camera